August 12, 2020

Who’s There? – #ShortmovieMonday by Dariel Hernandez

Who's ThereMaybe it’s just because of the age I’m at, but it seems like EVERYBODY around me is getting divorced.  Couples that I have known half my life are calling it quits, and the friendships that we endured are usually trashed (I know it’s not fair, but it just seems the way it is.).  Hell, half the time I end up mad at these couples because their inability to communicate drives a wedge between my wife and me.

And the kids…

The kids get the shaft the worst.  My Facebook time line is filled with “father of the year” candidates every 2nd weekend, and mothers complaining the fathers won’t take them an extra second beyond that allotted time the rest of the time.  The kids become pawns in these legal battles, and each parent asserts that he/she loves the child more because [insert peeve of the week].

For this week’s #ShortmovieMonday, I watched the student film Who’s There? (written and directed by Dariel Hernandez).  In the film, a young boy is the victim of a nasty divorce (Matt Munoz).  His mother (Kate McCay) has custody of him, but is too embroiled in her legal and emotional woes to care for him.  While she makes phone call after phone call to attorneys (and even her ex-husband), the boy is neglected and bored with only a tennis ball to entertain him.

That’s when a mysterious knock occurs on the other side of the wall…

I liked this film a lot.  It’s simple, and it doesn’t pull any punches.  A child’s curiosity and ability to adapt to different situations fits perfectly here.  The son is a “perfect” child.  He listens to his mother, and sits quietly while she fumes on the phone.  He tries to get her attention and she blows him off.  It’s scary what a child will accept for just a bit of affection.

Munoz does a great job as the forgotten son, but McCay is quite stiff in her lines.  However, McCay does come across as an exasperated woman and may be quite numb to the world anyways.  The knocking was reminiscent of Let the Right One In, but that was done between two established friends.  The knocking here leads to the suspense.  I liked the reveal, but it may have been just as good with a mere glimpse rather than a double take.  Like I said before, the story is simple yet effective.  Hernandez is comfortable with the camera as this looks phenomenal, and I look forward to what will come.

Trapjaw

Trapjaw

I love horror movies, and I have since I was young. My favorite genre is the zombie genre, but it has completely been overdone in the last few years. I'm not a big fan of the horror movie formula, and I love it when a director turns it on its head. Please follow me on twitter (@_trapjaw_) and like me on facebook (scaretissuetrapjaw) for updates and to be immediately informed of new posts/projects.

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